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Plenary Speakers

 

Stephanie Farrell, Rowan Univ. US

Abstract

Spatial ability refers to a variety of skills related to understanding, remembering and transforming spatial relations among different visual images.  Spatial ability is a type of intelligence that is distinct from others such as verbal and quantitative reasoning.  A well-established link exists between spatial visualization skills and academic and professional success in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields; individuals with superior spatial visualization skills tend to gravitate toward and excel in those disciplines, and students in STEM may be disadvantaged by poor spatial skills. The development of spatial visualization skills is influenced by a vast array of factors including gender, race, ethnicity, culture, primary language, socio-economic status, educational level, and background experiences.  Much of the research on spatial visualization skills related to STEM education has focused on gender:  gender differences favouring men are robust, the gender gap in spatial ability can be narrowed through intervention in a relatively short time, interventions to improve spatial skills results in improved academic success and retention in STEM at U.S. institutions.  This talk begins to explore some of the strong cross-cultural differences in spatial ability, the implications for STEM education, and the use of online training to improve spatial skills in a relatively short time.

 Bio/Photo

Dr. Stephanie Farrell is Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University (USA) and was the 2014-2015 Fulbright Scholar in Engineering Education at Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland).  As a pioneer of inductive pedagogy in engineering courses, Dr. Farrell studied the role of experiments in promoting conceptual understanding in engineering.  Her current research involves improving engineering education through the use of virtual communities and online technology.  Dr. Farrell has been recognized nationally and internationally for contributions to engineering education through her work in experiential learning and faculty development.  In 2012 she was awarded Honoris Causa in Engineering Education from the Internationale Gesellschaft für Inginieurpädagogik (IGIP).  She has been honored by the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) with several teaching awards such as the National Outstanding Teaching Medal and the Quinn Award for experiential learning. Dr. Farrell has been elected twice to the Board of Directors of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE), and she serves on the Executive Committee of the International Federation of Engineering Education Societies (IFEES).


 

Petros Groumpos, Univ. Of Patras, GR

Abstract and bio will be here soon

 

 Arnold Pears, Uppsala Univ., SE

Abstract

During the first decade of the 21st century the MOOC phenomenon caught the imagination of academics, policy makers, and think tanks world wide. Widely touted as a panacea to the educational challenges of the century, a paradigm shift, and major game changer in the highereducation landscape MOOC was predicted to threaten the future of traditional universities. MOOC would replace face to face teaching as the dominant paradigm of a new age of digital education without economic, geographical or socio-economic boundaries. Udacity founder Sebastian Thrun was quoted in an article in Wired magazine in March 2012, making a bold prediction. 

” In 50 years, he [said], there will be only 10 institutions in the world delivering higher education and Udacity has a shot at being one of them. Thrun just has to plot the right course." He was not alone in predicting the demise of the traditional University! The same year (2012) Ernst and Young Australia published a report on the MOOC phenomenon claiming, ”[…] that the dominant university model in Australia — a broad-based teaching and research institution, supported by a large asset base and a large, predominantly in-house back office — will prove unviable in all but a few cases over the next 10-15 years.” As we move into 2016 these bold predictions seems increasingly less likely to come to fruition, however, the bold foray into ubiquitous online education has ushered in a new flora of digital resources and delivery platforms for online learners. By reflecting on the MOOC experience we can draw some important lessons with which to fuel our continuing quest for a ”Brave New World” of open education for all. 

http://www.it.uu.se/katalog/arnoldp

 Title of Presentation: The Rise and Fall of MOOC: What Can we Learn About the Education of the Future? 

  

Bio/Photo


Arnold Neville Pears, The Uppsala University, Sweden

BSc (Hons) 1986, PhD 1993, La Trobe University, Melbourne Australia. Lecturer and Senior Lecturer 1991-2000 La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia Senior Lecturer/Assoc. Prof. 2000-2006 Uppsala University Sweden. Dr Pears was awarded the Uppsala University Pedagogy Prize in 2008, and appointed as Associate Professor of Computing Education Research in May 2011. His roles at Uppsala University include appointment to the University Academic Senate, Programme Director for the IT Engineering programme, member of the selection committee for the Uppsala University Pedgogy prize and as member of the educational advisory board of the Faculty of Technology and Natural Sciences. He has a strong interest in teaching and learning research in computer science and engineering, and leads the UpCERG research group in computing and engineering education research at Uppsala University. He has published 25 articles in the area internationally, and is well known as a computing education researcher through his professional activities in the ACM, and IEEE. In the IEEE he has served as a member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Computer Society 2012-2014, where he is active in the Education Activities Board, serving also on the steering committee of the Frontiers in Education Conference and as Chair of the newly established Special Technical Community (STC) for Education. In addition he is a Director of CeTUSS (The Swedish National Center for Pedagogical Development of Technology Education in a Societal and Student Oriented Context, www.cetuss.se) and the IEEE Education Society Nordic Chapter.

 

RSAM2015
8-10 September 2016
15th International Conference on
Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training
ISTANBUL
IEEE
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